03 Building Self-Esteem

  • Introduction View and study the YouTube video: How to build Self-Esteem

  • Having positive self-esteem is important as leaders; thus, examining the way we view ourselves is essential for changing self-destructive ideas and thoughts.
  • It may sound a strange, but feeling good about who you are -- that is, having a healthy amount of self-esteem and self-confidence -- is one of those things that will help make your life happier and more successful. Having confidence in yourself and your abilities goes a long way whether you're facing a tough decision, adapting to a new situation or standing up against peer pressure. Here are some tips on how to build your self-esteem:
  • Take a deep breath.
    Staying relaxed and being laid-back in general can help you see the bigger picture and not sweat the small stuff so much. It's also a good frame of mind to be in when you're taking a close look at the things you're not so good at
  • Take inventory of your strengths.

    Everybody's good at something, and many people are good at quite a few things. Even if you don't have a talent or strength that you're aware of, you probably have some interests you can develop into strengths.

    Make a list of a few things you're good at and a few things you're interested in and would like to be better at. Share this list with your parents, an aunt or uncle, or a teacher you like and trust. They can probably help you find other things you're good at, too, and help you come up with a plan for developing other skills and interests.
  • Realize your limits.
    Nobody's perfect -- not even close. It may not always seem this way, but it's true. So if you weren't born a good singer, a super athlete or an "A" student, that's OK. You have a personality and a perspective on the world that's all your own and completely valuable -- even if you suck at basketball, have a big nose or look terrible in leggings.
  • Stop putting yourself down. Now!

    One of the biggest things that keeps people from achieving their goals -- and feeling good about themselves -- is negative self-talk. In other words, telling yourself that you're a loser or a failure puts a big damper on your ability to get what you want and be who you want.

    If you don't do well at a particular project or task, it doesn't mean that you never will. Perhaps you weren't prepared or the time simply wasn't right. It doesn't mean that you're a lousy human being or that you'll never succeed. It's OK to be upset for a bit when things don't go your way, but after a little while, let it go and move on. You'll be that much closer to achieving what you want if you do.
  • Celebrate progress and small victories.
    Did you pass your driver's test or give a killer speech despite feeling nervous? Give credit where credit's due: You did it, and you rule! And guess what? You can tackle bigger, harder projects, too.
  • Pat yourself on the back every day.
    Find a few small things that you did well each day. Whether it's waking up on time, smiling at the dorky hall monitor or sending a card to your grandmother, a lot of good can be accomplished in one day -- and it's something to take pride in.